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July 2020 Issue

Special Focus Issue: Sterile Processing

This July issue includes a CE article on surgical instrument manufacturing and how different surgical instruments’ functionality can affect procedure efficiency, patient outcomes, and surgeon satisfaction; and a CE article on establishing a safe environment in which patients and perioperative team members are protected from injuries related to patient handling and movement. The Clinical Issues column explores ensuring patient safety under time pressure, holes in the outer layer of sterilization wraps, changing surgical attire after smoking outside, and methemoglobinemia after local anesthesia.

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Featured CE Articles

Instrument Manufacturing: Implications for Perioperative Teams

The manufacturing process for surgical instruments is complex, and perioperative nurses should understand the process to assist with purchasing decisions. When making these decisions, perioperative nurses should partner with surgeons, sterile processing department personnel, and the manufacturers’ representatives to discuss the scope of use and plans for reprocessing. Surgical instruments’ functionality can affect procedure efficiency, patient outcomes, and surgeon satisfaction. Knowledge about surgical instrument manufacturing should help perioperative teams provide safer care for their patients.

Back to Basics 2.0: Safe Patient Handling and Movement

Occupational injuries associated with nursing frequently involve the musculoskeletal system; these injuries typically involve the lower back, shoulders, and upper extremities. Many of these injuries are a result of overuse and repetitive movements, including various physical stressors. The nature of the perioperative environment increases the possibility that health care workers will experience physical stressors. This column addresses some key components required to establish a safe environment in which patients and perioperative team members are protected from injuries related to patient handling and movement.

Clinical Issues—July 2020

This month’s Q&A column addresses the following topics:

  • Ensuring patient safety under time pressure
  • Holes in the outer layer of sterilization wraps
  • Changing surgical attire after smoking outside
  • Methemoglobinemia after local anesthesia

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